• 4 February 2019

    Circular Cities

    3 models for a sustainable city: the Circular Economy applied to the urban context A story of two cities. The first is the city as we have known it so far. The air made unbearable by pollution. It is very difficult to dispose of waste properly. Resources are widely wasted or underused. The other is a sustainable and circular city. Here the waste does not exist, the resources are used to the best according to the rules of the sharing economy and the energy required is completely produced from renewable sources. In the middle, there are the real cities, which are more or less similar to one or the other model. Cities are the first context in which it is essential to apply the terms of the Circular Economy. Because they represent an area in which it is perhaps easier to agree on its founding principles. Also because, above all, they are the place par excellence where humans live and will live. Why the cities? According to a World Bank report, 54% of the global population lives in urban areas and in cities, 85% of world GDP is produced (data: 2017). 75% of the natural resources are consumed here, 50% of the waste produced and greenhouse gas emissions equal to 60-80% of the total, according to different estimates. It is therefore clear that we need to start from the cities if we want to influence the way in which human beings live together and exploit resources. Also because the trend is destined to increase, by 2050 75% of the population will be living in cities. This means that even more funds will be invested in cities: infrastructures will be at the center of the growth strategies for the cities. Increasingly, natural resources, capitals, talents, and data will be concentrated in urban contexts....
  • 4 February 2019

    Why Re-think & Tondo?

    “With Re-think we take the first step towards the Circular Economy” Accelerating the transition from the linear model, in which we live, to a new circular productive paradigm, where nothing is wasted and human activities have no negative output on the environment. This is the target of Tondo, an association unofficially launched in April 2018, which was set up in November of the same year, with the idea of ​​acting concretely for the development of the Circular Economy. The association arised from the will of Francesco Castellano, president and founder of Tondo: «We want to transform the Circular Economy into a practical reality». The first step is Re-Think, a forum on the Circular Economy, to be held in Milan on the 14th of February, at the Catholic University (for more information, click here: http://re-think.today/). The event will involve industry experts, startups and corporations that are moving towards the Circular Economy. Why participate? Castellano explains this: «The forum is an opportunity to acquire a medium and long term vision on some topics related to the Circular Economy. Participating therefore means finding ideas that will soon become market trends and opportunities to develop new businesses». In this interview, Francesco tells us about the birth and the objectives of Tondo. How is Tondo born? The idea for the association comes from my real experience. I was swimming in the sea, the place was beautiful from a naturalistic point of view, but it was completely ruined by the presence of plastic: there was plastic everywhere. On the sand, in the sea. I began to question myself about the world in which we live and I have identified two enormous problems, evident to all, which it is impossible to not see now. The first is plastic: it is stupid to continue throwing tons of plastics...
  • 4 February 2019

    Circular Economy

    Che cos’è l’economia circolare e perché è importante per tutti: cittadini, imprese, istituzioni Mentre è chiaro il ‘perché’ dell’economia circolare, molto spesso sfugge il ‘come’. A dirlo, un recente report della Global Fashion Agenda. Un settore, quello della moda, che trova spesso difficoltà a sposare un approccio ecologico. Ecco perché è ancora più importante che la filosofia dell’economia circolare sia sposata dal fashion: per citare solo due dati, il 20% dello spreco di risorse idriche derive dall’industria della moda, a livello globale, e il 10% delle emissioni di anidride carbonica sono dovute al tessile. Ma in che senso è chiaro il ‘perché’ e sfugge però il ‘come’? La ragione per cui modelli come l’economia circolare si stanno diffondendo è chiara: i residui di plastica che invadono mari e oceani (e quindi tutta la fauna marina), il global warming, i cambiamenti climatici sono fenomeni largamente indagati dalla comunità scientifica e (quasi) tutti gli attori in campo si rendono conto che è tempo di agire in questa direzione. Manca il ‘come’, però, forse perché manca una definizione univoca di cosa sia in effetti l’economia circolare ‘in atto’: quali sono i suoi obiettivi? Quali i processi irrinunciabili? Quali i principi fondativi? In effetti domande simili non sono affatto banali e richiedono riflessioni approfondite. Cos’è l’economia circolare Come nasce l’economia circolare? È l’economista Kenneth E. Boulding, a dare una prima idea di un circuito circolare dei materiali, in cui cioè la produzione non ha alcun residuo, ma tutto viene reintegrato e reimpiegato nel circuito produttivo. È il 1966 quando Boulding scrive il suo articolo “The Economics of the ComingSpaceship Earth”. Da allora il concetto è evoluto e si è formalizzato negli ultimi decenni, soprattutto a causa dell’emergere dei cambiamenti climatici, nella definizione di circular economy, in ambito accademico. Dove però siamo ancora ben lungi...
  • 4 February 2019

    Circular Cities

    3 models for a sustainable city: the Circular Economy applied to the urban context A story of two cities. The first is the city as we have known it so far. The air made unbearable by pollution. It is very difficult to dispose of waste properly. Resources are widely wasted or underused. The other is a sustainable and circular city. Here the waste does not exist, the resources are used to the best according to the rules of the sharing economy and the energy required is completely produced from renewable sources. In the middle, there are the real cities, which are more or less similar to one or the other model. Cities are the first context in which it is essential to apply the terms of the Circular Economy. Because they represent an area in which it is perhaps easier to agree on its founding principles. Also because, above all, they are the place par excellence where humans live and will live. Why the cities? According to a World Bank report, 54% of the global population lives in urban areas and in cities, 85% of world GDP is produced (data: 2017). 75% of the natural resources are consumed here, 50% of the waste produced and greenhouse gas emissions equal to 60-80% of the total, according to different estimates. It is therefore clear that we need to start from the cities if we want to influence the way in which human beings live together and exploit resources. Also because the trend is destined to increase, by 2050 75% of the population will be living in cities. This means that even more funds will be invested in cities: infrastructures will be at the center of the growth strategies for the cities. Increasingly, natural resources, capitals, talents, and data will be concentrated in urban contexts....
  • 4 February 2019

    Why Re-think & Tondo?

    “With Re-think we take the first step towards the Circular Economy” Accelerating the transition from the linear model, in which we live, to a new circular productive paradigm, where nothing is wasted and human activities have no negative output on the environment. This is the target of Tondo, an association unofficially launched in April 2018, which was set up in November of the same year, with the idea of ​​acting concretely for the development of the Circular Economy. The association arised from the will of Francesco Castellano, president and founder of Tondo: «We want to transform the Circular Economy into a practical reality». The first step is Re-Think, a forum on the Circular Economy, to be held in Milan on the 14th of February, at the Catholic University (for more information, click here: http://re-think.today/). The event will involve industry experts, startups and corporations that are moving towards the Circular Economy. Why participate? Castellano explains this: «The forum is an opportunity to acquire a medium and long term vision on some topics related to the Circular Economy. Participating therefore means finding ideas that will soon become market trends and opportunities to develop new businesses». In this interview, Francesco tells us about the birth and the objectives of Tondo. How is Tondo born? The idea for the association comes from my real experience. I was swimming in the sea, the place was beautiful from a naturalistic point of view, but it was completely ruined by the presence of plastic: there was plastic everywhere. On the sand, in the sea. I began to question myself about the world in which we live and I have identified two enormous problems, evident to all, which it is impossible to not see now. The first is plastic: it is stupid to continue throwing tons of plastics...
  • 4 February 2019

    Circular Economy

    Che cos’è l’economia circolare e perché è importante per tutti: cittadini, imprese, istituzioni Mentre è chiaro il ‘perché’ dell’economia circolare, molto spesso sfugge il ‘come’. A dirlo, un recente report della Global Fashion Agenda. Un settore, quello della moda, che trova spesso difficoltà a sposare un approccio ecologico. Ecco perché è ancora più importante che la filosofia dell’economia circolare sia sposata dal fashion: per citare solo due dati, il 20% dello spreco di risorse idriche derive dall’industria della moda, a livello globale, e il 10% delle emissioni di anidride carbonica sono dovute al tessile. Ma in che senso è chiaro il ‘perché’ e sfugge però il ‘come’? La ragione per cui modelli come l’economia circolare si stanno diffondendo è chiara: i residui di plastica che invadono mari e oceani (e quindi tutta la fauna marina), il global warming, i cambiamenti climatici sono fenomeni largamente indagati dalla comunità scientifica e (quasi) tutti gli attori in campo si rendono conto che è tempo di agire in questa direzione. Manca il ‘come’, però, forse perché manca una definizione univoca di cosa sia in effetti l’economia circolare ‘in atto’: quali sono i suoi obiettivi? Quali i processi irrinunciabili? Quali i principi fondativi? In effetti domande simili non sono affatto banali e richiedono riflessioni approfondite. Cos’è l’economia circolare Come nasce l’economia circolare? È l’economista Kenneth E. Boulding, a dare una prima idea di un circuito circolare dei materiali, in cui cioè la produzione non ha alcun residuo, ma tutto viene reintegrato e reimpiegato nel circuito produttivo. È il 1966 quando Boulding scrive il suo articolo “The Economics of the ComingSpaceship Earth”. Da allora il concetto è evoluto e si è formalizzato negli ultimi decenni, soprattutto a causa dell’emergere dei cambiamenti climatici, nella definizione di circular economy, in ambito accademico. Dove però siamo ancora ben lungi...
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