Month: April 2021

  • By Giovanna Matrone English Version When during Christmas vacations I told my father I was getting enthusiastic about Circular Economy he started laughing. He is a 73 years old electronic engineer. He is passionate about any new technology innovation but quite skeptical about new business models linked to new generation values. Honestly – at that moment I was a little disappointed. Then, I started thinking about his reaction. Especially about why he showed himself cynical. As often happens, I found the answer working on another topic. In the same period, indeed, I was deepening concepts about cognitive biases for a study on Diversity and Inclusion. These biases are systematic patterns of deviation from norm or rationality in judgment and decisions. So, I asked myself: is there any link between Circular Economy and biases? The answer is yes. Actually, not many studies have been found, but among those few, the most try to empirically demonstrate that consumers often behave far from traditional patterns of rationality, as influenced by cognitive biases. If this is valid for the relationship between consumer and product, emerging studies are demonstrating this “irrational” link exists also toward the acceptance of new business models, despite ethical values involved. From this perspective, it becomes imperative to explore, understand and overcome these barriers to allow the implementation of innovative models aimed to support the Circular Economy in creating value for customers, societies, and companies. The possibility for individuals to form and express their identity is key to enable acceptance of products and models. In their positions and decisions, people are influenced by their own values and beliefs, born from a specific set of factors, linked to psychology and personal experience, social environment, and culture. Individual and social factors The individual factors are those deeply reflecting the values of people. Psychological mechanisms, habits, attitudes are just a few among them. People are strongly willing to...
  • By Giovanni Colombo, Senior Public Affairs Manager at EIT Food – from ReThink 2020 English Version EIT Food is one of the eight Knowledge and Innovation Communities created by the EU under the umbrella of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology and is building an ecosystem to generate innovative solutions to make the food system more circular and bring these solutions to the market.  The “Circular Food Systems” is one of the six Focus Areas. EIT Food, as Europe’s leading food initiative, is working to make the food system more sustainable, healthy, and trusted.  It works in synergy with Europe’s leading agri-food companies, research institutes, universities, and startups to transform the food system and tackle some of the big societal challenges such as food waste. In the EU, around 88 million tonnes of food waste are generated annually, which represents 20% of food production and it is estimated that this could feed 200 million people. The production and disposal of this food waste generate 170 million tonnes of CO2 which accounts for 6% of greenhouse gas emissions of the European Union. The global cost is 870 billion euros. Today, the reduction of food waste is an opportunity because it could help to close the gap between the food needed to feed the planet in 2050 and the food that was available in 2010 by more than 20%. This has been recognized also by the UN SDGs target n° 12.3 which asks us to halve the food waste by 2030. In the European context, food waste covers food loss and food waste and it occurs at all stages of the value chain. Even though in Europe food waste occurs mostly at the consumption level, synergic efforts should be addressing the problem of food waste at all stages of the value chain. Colombo...
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