Circular Economy

  • 30 September 2020

    ZEROBARRACENTO

    ZEROBARRACENTO is a gender-neutral zero-waste brand envisioning outerwear as a service. The fundamental values of the company are 0% waste and gender on the one side, and 100% traceability, transparency and inclusiveness on the other side. In addition, the hundred percent stand for 100% sustainability, an issue that has been at the core of the brand since the beginning. Following the product principles of the brand, the clothing lines need to be clean, essential and sourced locally. Therefore, the company is exclusively using materials coming from certified suppliers. To guarantee short transportation ways, every step of the design, product development and manufacturing takes place in Italy and factories are chosen in such a way that they are close to the place where the raw materials have been sourced. Moreover, the selected suppliers operate in the cities/regions which show the highest level of expertise in working with sustainable materials. For the organic and recycled wools, Biella and Prato have been chosen as supplier districts for instance. All material inputs are certified, of high quality and flow through a production/consumption chain that is circular. In addition, every product is self-complementary, designed to last and fully traceable throughout the value chain. One of the materials is Newlife™, a certified yarn, made from 100% post-consumer bottles. The patterns of the textiles are developed with a zero-waste design technique that eliminates textile waste at the design stage, an approach that contributes to reduce the use of natural resources. Usually, around 15% of textiles go wasted in the production process of fashion clothes. The technique involves eliminating waste by removing accessories (no buttons, no zippers, no hooks and eyes) and included the selvedge when sewing the garments. This way the final products are finished up with just a few seams. The packaging is made of compostable...
  • 15 September 2020

    Innovation Call

    At Tondo we support changemakers and therefore we are pleased to announce an Innovation Call with a focus on the Circular Economy and related to our main event Re-think Circular Economy Forum! Startups that carry out activities related to the Circular Economy can apply to the Innovation Call organized by Tondo with different partners. The call aims to select highly innovative projects that are feasible from a business point of view and capable of generating a strong positive impact on the environment. The call is open to the startups that are already established, or innovative ideas which are not yet materialized and which are operating in the thematic macro-areas that will be discussed during Re-think Circular Economy Forum (Agri-food, Cities, Materials and Technology), the event on the Circular Economy organized by Tondo on October 27th and 28th. The call might give to the selected startups the possibility to pitch during the main event and, in addition, the four winning startups (one for each macro-area) will receive some services from our partners (such as strategic and commercial support, help in applying to national and European grants,…), and a cash prize of 1.500 € will be awarded to the one that will achieve the highest score by the innovation jury. The macro-areas of the event, that are also the main focus of the Innovation Call are: Agri-food: agriculture 4.0, new types of cultivation such as Indoor and Vertical farming, and new methods of food preservation and transportation; Cities: urban context organized in a circular way, presenting actual projects, but also possible future trends with a focus on smart cities, mobility, biocycle & waste, urban, water, and air; Materials: biomaterials that are increasingly replacing synthetic ones, emerging practices in the reuse and regeneration of materials (organic and synthetic) and future trends in material science; Technologies: emerging technologies that...
  • 4 September 2020

    ilVespaio

    ilVespaio is a network of free-lance designers with a focus on ecodesign and sustainability. A team of creatives, researchers and educators promotes awareness on social and environmental issues, organizing workshops, events, contests and educational exhibitions with companies, local authorities, schools and families. Why ilVespaio? IlVespaio was founded by the graphic designer Stefano Castiglioni and the product designer Alessandro Garlandini in 2008, based on the idea of designing and producing promotional merchandise made of re-used production scraps and other materials. A circular promotional item unique and customized, instead than cheap junk imported from Asia. We called ourselves ilVespaio, the Italian word for wasp nest, because we were looking for a name from the natural world recalling movement, dynamism and creative chaos. Wasps are usually considered useless, annoying insects. However, they are very important for the ecosystem and for impollination, but, unlike bees, they proudly refuse to be tamed and don’t like to work for humans. They use attics to create their nests, instead! Our first project was a production of bags for the Provincia di Varese made of reused non-woven banners, reclaimed along the race route during the Varese World Championship Road Race 2008. Since then, we did many projects all sharing the same approach based on interactivity, playfulness, and care for design and graphics. The team has grown: designers Sebastiano Ercoli and Clara Giardina and videomaker Luca Orioli joined ilVespaio and other collaborators are helping us on specific projects. We strongly believe that citizens play a crucial role in the transition towards circular economy and that we need to focus on education especially of children and new generations. We have developed projects to raise awareness on environmental issues and to promote conscious behaviours. Every medium is strategic to convey messages that are important to us: exhibitions, outdoor events, workshops and...
  • 27 July 2020

    CE and COVID-19

    By Alexandra Kekkonen – Tondo’s associate What have we learned about Circular Economy from COVID crisis? The massive disruption of the global value chains in the result of the measures taken by the governments to address the Covid-19 crisis has revealed the fragility of our lineal global economy model and productive arrangements linked to a single geographic location and a single supplier, high degree of dissolution of our innovation, production, supply and consumption systems. (Serada, 2020) It has raised the concerns about the resilience of our economies and led to intensification of such trends as diversification of sourcing and supplies, reshoring, developing strategic autonomy in the critical sectors, intensifying automation, transforming supply chains into more simple, digital, regional more transparent, facilitated by the new delivery modes and contactless innovations. The experiences obtained during the COVID 19 crisis have reaffirmed – there is a need of the great reset and building a more resilient, just, responsive and sustainable economies. Circular Economy is increasingly considered a valuable option allowing to collectively reimagine and redesign our systems to ensure an ecologically safe and socially just space for all. The circular economy also now has the opportunity and duty to further incorporate equality and resilience into this model.  Product design and product policy factors such as repairability, reusability and potential for remanufacturing offer considerable opportunities to enhance stock availability and, therefore, resilience. Rethinking business models in terms of the circular economy presents many opportunities to improve competitiveness, efficiency, innovation and sustainability including through facilitating an access to and shared use of underutilized products.  Circular supplies represent a model for developing components that are reusable and recyclable at the end of a product’s life.  Product life extension prolongs the useful life of a product through improved product design and long-term maintenance.   Resource recovery captures byproducts...
  • 16 July 2020

    Corso di formazione

    Per realizzare un’efficace transizione del sistema economico e industriale verso un modello basato sull’Economia Circolare è necessario garantire a tutti degli strumenti per rispondere alla crescente richiesta di conoscenze, competenze e strumenti da parte del mondo imprenditoriale e manageriale. Ed è per questo che siamo lieti di comunicarvi che da ottobre 2020 partirà ufficialmente il corso di alta formazione “Gestione strategica dell’Economia Circolare: per una transizione verso nuovi modelli produttivi“. Il corso nasce da una proposta iniziale di Tondo e si concretizza grazie alla proficua collaborazione con ALTIS, Alta Scuola Impresa e Società dell’Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, e Circularity: è quindi, l’esito dell’incontro tra tre esponenti di eccellenza del mondo della sostenibilità e dell’Economia Circolare. Per scaricare la brochure del corso registrati qui. La data di inizio del corso sarà il 30 ottobre, pochi giorni dopo lo svolgimento dell’evento Re-think – Circular Economy Forum organizzato da Tondo; si andranno infatti ad approfondire alcune delle tematiche trattate durante l’evento e ad acquisire le competenze necessarie per coniugare sostenibilità, innovazione e creazione di valore all’insegna di business circolari. Il corso si concluderà il 19 dicembre e verrà fornito un attestato di partecipazione ufficiale da parte dell’Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore. Struttura del corso Il corso sarà accessibile online e saranno disponibili due modalità di partecipazione, a scelta: Completo – dirette straming + videoregistrazioni : 4 moduli, ciascuno dei quali prevede 1 settimana di lezioni videoregistrate e due sessioni in diretta streaming (il venerdì dalle 16 alle 19 e il sabato dalle 10 alle 13) Base – videoregistrazioni: 4 moduli accessibili fino a giugno 2021. Programma del corso Il corso si articola attorno a 4 macro-tematiche, corrispondenti ai 4 moduli: Circular Economy, Strategy and Business Models, che dedicherà particolare attenzione alle teorie che concorrono a definire il concetto, alla produzione normativa che contribuisce a identificarne perimetro e direzioni di...
  • 8 July 2020

    CE in Estonia

    By Alexandra Kekkonen – Tondo’s associate Estonia is an innovative nation in Northern Europe known globally for its digital ambitions. It is one of the top countries in Europe in terms of start-ups per capita and ranks first in the Entrepreneurship Index by the WEF. The country is a world pioneer in providing public services online – 99% of all public services provided 24/7 online. Thanks to smart e-solutions, it takes only a few hours to start a company and minutes to declare taxes.   Estonia has a small population (1,3 m.) and territory (45,226 km²). Unlike other countries, the country is characterized by strong deurbanization tendencies in 15-years perspective. Another distinct feature of the Estonian society is so-called slow living approach: a large part of the population does not consider economic growth a priority[1]. These trends are enhanced by declining and ageing population (as of January 1, 2020, the share of people over 65 in the population structure of Estonia was 20.04% of the population) Ecological footprint per person is 7.1 gha, whereas biocapacity [2] is 9.5 gha per person, leaving a room for improvement. Approximately 71% of Estonia’s gross domestic product (by value added) is generated in the service sector, industries account for 25%, and extractive industries (including agriculture and mining) – about 4%, mainly oil shale. Estonia is the second largest emitter of CO2 per capita in the European Union and by far the most carbon-intensive economy among the OECD countries. The reason for that is oil shale, sedimentary rock that has been mined in Estonia for electricity generation since the fifties and, since recently, have also been used for liquid diesel fuel production. The country contains second largest deposits of oil shale (2.49 billion metric tons of shale oil) in the EU after Italy (10.45 billion metric tons...
  • 5 June 2020

    Seay

    SEAY is production of sustainable beachwear from certified fabrics, short and local sourcing chains, conscious distribution policies and a marketing plan built around an intentional positive environmental impact.  The fashion industry is moving fast to meet growing demand for low environmental impact garments resulting as much sustainable as possible. Organic cotton, recycled fabrics, natural dyes and low-carbon footprint supply chains are becoming day after day more requested in a sector dominated by fast-fashion chains that struggle to guarantee to their shareholders a certain marginality, blocking them to adopt green business models, leaving room for small brands to raise their popularity. So far, in the beachwear industry, very few brands have focused their business on a low environmental impact model and it is with this idea in mind that in March 2019 SOSEATY Collective and its SEAY brand was born. Certified fabrics, short and local sourcing chains, conscious distribution policies and a marketing plan built around a green manifesto.  Not products with an ethnic look or typical of the fair trade sector, but goods able to express the latest fashion trends with the added value of materials and a business model capable of guaranteeing a circular economy. Sustainability in Fashion industry The colors and details of SEAY garments are aligned to the latest swimwear trends, but their certified yarns and the business model built around the paradigms of the circular economy describe the future of fashion. Giorgio Armani’s recent statements on the non sustainability – economic, ecological and ethical – of fashion as it has evolved in the last decade, is aligned with the vision of SEAY: fashion, which has always been a cultural expression, must stop responding to logics of fast fashion and return to a more human and sustainable dimension (both ecologically and socially). Armani underlined the necessary longevity...
  • 30 April 2020

    The New Economy

    By Katsiaryna Serada – Research Fellow & Policy Analyst at Tondo The pandemic COVID 19 has questioned the foundations of our global economy, demonstrated the weaknesses of our current economic model in facing real and potential global challenges, revealed the excessive and risky dependency on the global value chains and a single largest supplier. The COVID 19 demonstrated that the largest supply of the essential medical items, almost three-quarters of blood thinners imported by Italy, 60% of antibiotic components imported by Japan and 40% imported by Germany, Italy, and France, and largest amount of the medical masks come from China. (Javorcik, 2020)  Before the COVID-19 crisis, China produced around 20 million masks per day. By early March 2020 the production increased to 120 million per day, including through deploying idle productive capacity and repurposing other sectors such as automotive and electronics. Despite deploying additional productive capacity both in China and worldwide, the global spike in demand for medical and other supplies   during the COVID 19 crisis far exceeded both material stocks and available capacity to produce. The global value chains were hit in several dimensions – demand, international transportation networks, productive capacity — and were not able to respond the global health crisis. The governments of the exporting countries have addressed the increasing shortage or scarcity (risk of scarcity) in the domestic markets by imposing the numerous export restrictions on medical and other items. More than 70 economies, including the US, China and the EU, have introduced export restrictions to allocate domestic supplies to national healthcare systems and citizens first (Hoekman, Fiorini, 2020). Therefore, the COVID 19 crisis has explicitly demonstrated that the price mechanism and the markets have failed to accomplish social optimum and efficiently provide and allocate the resources. The crisis has explicitly demonstrated that the resources...
  • 21 February 2020

    PRiSMa-Med

    By Maddalena Fava – Partner of Cooperativa Ziguele Every year, millions of tons of waste end up in the sea or in the port area; this phenomenon derives from: poor management and collection of waste, lack of infrastructure, little knowledge about the serious consequences on the natural habitat.Since the 1970s, the scientific community has been paying attention to this phenomenon, known as “marine litter“: “any durable material produced by man and abandoned in the marine environment; waste resulting from human activities whose destiny is to accumulate in the marine environment”. Fishing, aquaculture and recreational waste includes special waste (batteries, motor oils), organic waste (undersized species, waste), waste collected at sea (plastic, glass, paper and cardboard, fabric, wood, ferrous material).Currently, in the ports, this waste has a disorganized management: no space is available for storage and there are no operating methods for disposal. The reuse practices of the organic fraction are completely absent. Because of this, fishermen who collect waste from the sea, not finding suitable structures on the ground, abandon them back into the water, helping to increase environmental problems even in port areas. PRiSMa-Med is a cooperation project funded on the Interreg Maritime program, born precisely to combat these problems.The project involves several public and private partners located in three Italian regions, Liguria (Liguria Region, TICASS Scrl), Tuscany (Tuscany Region, Gestimar Scpa, CIRSPE) Sardinia (FLAG North Sardinia, Union Comuni Alta Gallura), and Corsica (Chamber of Commerce of Ajaccio and Southern Corsica).The objective is the characterization of the waste produced by fishing activities or collected at sea and to reinsert them in the production cycle through feasibility studies of recovery chains. We want to contribute to the reduction of waste and waste deriving from fishing, aquaculture and therefore from ports. To do this we need a system of governance, integrated...
  • 26 November 2019

    Energy from the Oceans

    By Gianmaria Sannino – Senior Researcher at ENEA Gianmaria Sannino opened his speech during ReThink – Circular Ocean Forum in Genoa, with a brief and current introduction concerning the correlation between climate change and sea-level rise, explaining how the oceans absorb heat and they expand by increasing their volume. In addition to melting glaciers, in fact, the oceans’ temperature increase, is the second reason that causes the raising of the level, which is among the causes of the disaster that took place in November in Venice. The sea can also be exploited as an intelligent energy source, Sannino showed a quote by Joseph Conrad from the book Typhoon, which says “… he had never seen the immeasurable force and excessive anger, the anger that passes and runs out without ever subsiding – the anger and fury of the irritated sea”, which turns out to be a fictionalized definition of what marine renewable energy is. Even Victor Hugo already in 1874, with a quote taken from the novel “Novantatrè”, emphasizes how the sea is a source of energy that the earth should make use of: “Think of the movement of the waves, the ebb and flow, the coming and going of the tides. What is the ocean? a huge lost force. How stupid the earth is, not to use the ocean! “ The global marine energy potential can be a very powerful resource, it is estimated that the amount of marine energy we can extract is equal to 1,200 TWh / year, while the global wave is estimated to be 29,500 TWh / year, these data are surprising if we consider that the current global electricity demand is 25,600 TWh / year. It would be easy to ask why it is not exploited, the first reason is that this energy is not distributed...
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