Circular Economy

  • By Sara Salerno, Circular Economy Analyst at Tondo Lab It is time for the long-awaited Christmas and New Year’s holidays to take a break, spend time with loved ones and get some rest. The festive season will be even more peaceful if we keep a careful eye on the dangerous environmental impact that all periods of high consumption can generate. What is now certain is that this impact can be greatly reduced by taking simple daily measures. 10 tips for greener festivities: BUY only the amount of food you need and what’s in season, reusing the numerous leftovers for new and delicious meals. Or, freeze leftovers for another occasion or donate your surplus, if possible, to local associations and social cooperatives that locally deal with distribution. In fact, according to a study carried out at Ener2Crowd, in Italy at this time of the year people throw away around 500 thousand tonnes of food and we know that every tonne of waste can generate around 4.2 tonnes of CO2. Furthermore, it has been calculated that on average, during the Christmas period, a person can produce around 26kg of CO2 due to the food choices they make. However, there are eco-friendly alternatives: a vegetarian meal can save about 3kg of CO2 per person, a meal with at least 50% of organic food can save about 2kg of CO2 per person and finally, a low-waste meal can save up to 7kg of CO2 per person. AVOID using single use plates, cutlery and glasses which would generate a voluminous quantity of plastic or other material which is not always correctly disposed of. COLLECT the used cooking oil and dispose of it in the municipal collection centres designated for this activity, as they can be highly polluting for the environment. GIVE only useful or desired...
  • 9 December 2021

    Inclusion is sustainable!

    By Giovanna Matrone, Tondo associates Over the last years, Circular Economy has placed itself at the center of the international debate as a real transformative solution to overcome the prevailing linear model, with a potential boost in solving both economic, environmental and social challenges. However, issues related to social sustainability, well-being and equity, almost always remain peripheral in the contemporary debate, questioning the ability of the Circular Economy – as understood by many of the involved actors – to undertake a path towards progress that is truly sustainable.   There are many reasons why this happens. On the one hand, the consumption patterns we are used to put only the economic aspects at the center of well-being, forgetting the resulting inequalities; on the other hand, the social dimension is particularly complex to implement and make operational; finally, there are practical aspects that are not easy to solve, first of all the issue of impact measurement. In fact, it is much easier to agree on easily measurable environmental and economic metrics, such as reducing emissions or increasing turnover, instead of developing complex methodologies for social impact assessment.  However, we cannot and must not forget that a truly sustainable future implies a significant participation of all the members of a community with the aim of enhancing its diversity and offering well-being and equity to individuals and the community. This idea of conceiving the involvement of a growing plurality of people can be realized through inclusion, that is the ability to build an environment where – in the multiplicity of points of view, experiences, beliefs – everyone is and feels welcome, respected, supported in his/her uniqueness as well as empowered for full participation in common activities. Inclusion is the mean through which diversity expresses all its best potential.  This tool, whose practical declination takes on various nuances, is very...
  • 30 November 2021

    Re-think Taranto: final report

    Report conclusivo di Re-think Circular Economy Forum Taranto Re-think Circular Economy Forum tenutosi a Taranto il 28 e 29 settembre 2021 si è concluso con l’obiettivo di fare emergere le numerose opportunità e potenzialità del territorio tarantino e pugliese in ambito di sostenibilità ed economia circolare. Durante i due giorni di evento più di 40 sono state le realtà nazionali ed internazionali coinvolte per la presentazione di progetti, ricerche, attività imprenditoriali ed innovative e le varie opportunità del territorio sul tema della circolarità. Gli argomenti sui quali si è scelto di focalizzarsi, sulla base anche del contesto e delle iniziative che si stanno portando avanti sulla transizione verde e la circolarità in questo territorio, sono stati: transizione energetica e mobilità sostenibile, porti circolari e gestione ambientale. L’obiettivo di questo incontro tra personalità di spicco del territorio locale, nazionale ed internazionale è stato di presentare ed approfondire per un vasto pubblico, i trend e le tecnologie esistenti o in fase di sviluppo dei tre settori sopra citati. Dalle presentazioni dei relatori sono stati numerosi gli spunti, tra cui, ad esempio, l’importanza e l’impegno di molte aziende sul fronte della decarbonizzazione del settore energetico e dei trasporti tramite l’elettrificazione, l’adozione di bio-fuel e più in generale tramite la valorizzazione energetica dei rifiuti. Inoltre, come hanno anche confermato gli esperti, l’idrogeno avrà un ruolo centrale, principalmente in quei settori dove, ad oggi, non esistono soluzioni efficienti e percorribili per la riduzione dell’impronta carbonica. Anche le comunità energetiche, ad esempio, coinvolgendo attivamente cittadinanza e aziende in un lavoro di squadra, contribuiscono concretamente alla decarbonizzazione, modificando i ruoli tradizionali del consumatore, che diventa produttore, e del fornitore di energia che diventa anche fornitore di servizi. I porti e il trasporto marittimo, elementi essenziali della città di Taranto e in tutte quelle che si trovano sulla costa, si dovranno trasformare in hub di...
  • 2 November 2021

    Circular Design

    Laura Badalucco professoressa associata presso l’Università IUAV di Venezia si occupa di Design Circolare e durante il suo intervento al nostro evento Hacking the City ci ha parlato del ruolo che il designer ha nella transizione delle imprese verso l’economia circolare. Perché la Ellen MacArthur Foundation (EMF), ha domandato la Prof.ssa, insiste tanto nel dire che i designer sono figure fondamentali ed essenziali per questo processo di transizione? Tra tutte le definizioni esistenti riguardo l’Economia Circolare la Prof.ssa ha scelto quella dell’EMF che dice “L’obiettivo dell’Economia Circolare non è quello di minimizzare il flusso di materiali ed elementi, ma di generare metabolismi ciclici, in analogia con gli ecosistemi naturali, in modo da consentire agli elementi di mantenere il loro status di risorse e di accumulare intelligenza nel tempo”. Questa definizione invita non solo a gestire bene ed ottimizzare il flusso dei materiali, ma anche ad immaginare qualcosa di totalmente nuovo da produrre generando dei metabolismi ciclici (fondamentali per chi si occupa di progettazione e di produzione). Inoltre, questa definizione dice che è possibile garantire agli elementi il loro status di risorse e di accumulare in questi intelligenza nel tempo. Anche il tempo è un elemento imprescindibile nei processi di riflessione sull’Economia Circolare e nella sua progettazione. I tre asset fondamentali dell’Economia Circolare sono: progettare evitando la produzione di rifiuti e di inquinamento; mantenere i materiali il più possibile in uso; creare dei sistemi che siano il più possibile rigenerativi copiando quello che la natura fa da sempre ed avere dei sistemi che abbiano degli scopi utili non solo per il prodotto iniziale. Tutto ciò si collega a quello che diceva già Richard Buckminster Fuller negli anni ‘20-30, quando parlava di efemeralizzazione, cioè di fare sempre più e meglio con sempre meno peso, tempo, energia per ogni livello funzionale. Perché? Perché...
  • 19 October 2021

    Circular Threads: the report

    Press Release – Circular Threads Tondo has presented the first Italian study on the relationship between Textile industry and Circular Economy in Northern Italy. <To download the report: https://docsend.com/view/zbhfcu97zibu2qtq> To download the executive summary click here. Milan, 18 October 2021 – Tondo is pleased to present “Circular Threads”, the first study that aims to investigate the link between the Italian textile and fashion industry and the Circular Economy. You can download the report here. The study, carried out in collaboration with Fondazione Pistoletto, Associazione Tessile e Salute and rén collective, analysed the level of sustainability and circularity of textile and fashion companies in Northern Italy, with a particular focus on the Biella district, a pole of excellence and reference for the Italian textile sector. The study aims to provide an overview of the current situation and to accelerate the transition towards the circular economy in the textile sector, identifying the best practices implemented and the main challenges faced by companies. Specifically, a three-level analysis was conducted: for the first level, desk research, a series of sustainable and circular actions for the textile industry were identified and it was verified which of these actions were implemented in a sample of 300 companies in Northern Italy. As a second level of analysis, a questionnaire was submitted to a sample of almost 70 companies to assess the level of circular and sustainable practices implemented in a number of key areas. Lastly, a detailed analysis based on material flows was carried out for 2 companies in order to calculate the circularity index at product level using the Ellen MacArthur Foundation methodology. Considering the strategic importance of the Italian fashion and textile industry, the transition towards more circular and sustainable production models represents not only a necessity but also a relevant economic opportunity. However, the...
  • 18 October 2021

    Re-think Taranto

    RE-THINK CIRCULAR ECONOMY FORUM TARANTO 28-29 settembre 2021 – Dipartimento Jonico dell’Università di Bari Aziende, istituzioni, startup ed enti di ricerca hanno mostrato il loro percorso tutto circolare per favorire la nascita di attività innovative e imprenditoriali nel territorio tarantino e pugliese Milano, 5 ottobre 2021 – Far emergere le tante opportunità e potenzialità del territorio tarantino e pugliese da un punto di vista di sostenibilità ed economia circolare. Con questo obiettivo si è concluso Re-think Circular Economy Forum, evento di portata nazionale promosso e organizzato da Tondo, svoltosi a Taranto il 28 e 29 settembre 2021. L’evento ha riunito aziende, startup, enti di ricerca ed altre istituzioni per mettere in evidenza nuove strategie, progetti in corso e opportunità derivanti dall’Economia Circolare. Main partner dell’iniziativa è stata Eni, società integrata dell’energia impiegata nella transizione energetica per raggiungere la totale decarbonizzazione di prodotti e processi entro il 2050. Gli ulteriori partner dell’evento sono stati: il Comune di Taranto, l’associazione Eurota ETS, UniCredit, Fondazione ITS Logistica, EPM Servizi, Confapi Industria Taranto e New Euroart. Più di 40 realtà a confronto che hanno toccato svariate tematiche, dalla transizione energetica e mobilità sostenibile ai porti circolari e alla gestione ambientale. Tra i tanti ospiti, Eni, Comune di Taranto, Confindustria, Confapi, Ordine degli Ingegneri, Enel, Ingelia, Reset, Suez, Free Energy Saving, UniCredit, New Euroart, Autorità Portuale di Taranto, Circle Economy, MSC, Invitalia, Unità di Misura, Irigom, Ecopneus, EPM. L’evento ha riscosso particolare successo sia in presenza, con più di 400 persone che hanno partecipato nei diversi momenti delle due giornate, sia online, con più di 1000 persone collegate nei 2 giorni. «Il successo di questo debutto dice molto sulle potenzialità che il territorio offre – commenta Gianni Azzaro, Consigliere Nazionale ANCI e primo promotore dell’evento -Taranto è pronta per essere luogo dove teoria e pratica...
  • 5 October 2021

    Circular Tourism

    By Valentina Ndou – Prof.ssa presso Facoltà di Ingegneria dell’Innovazione, Università del Salento  How can tourism firms contribute to the CE development? Today, the tourism sector is at a turning point. The Covid -19 pandemic situation is considered a unique event with disastrous effects on the socio-politic and economic situation of countries, organizations, and businesses. Tourism has been among the hardest hit by the pandemic situation with a simultaneous shock in demand and supply.   Understandably, many tourism researchers worldwide are now debating about strategies, policies, and new business models for sector recovery and restart. What is being echoed by most researchers is to convert the challenges of this crisis into opportunities for rethinking and innovating the competitive strategies of the sector to resist destruction as well as for growth and renewal.   While the pandemic situation has profoundly affected the tourism value chain worldwide, sustainable tourism development is emerging as a critical issue for future development trajectories. It is being widely argued that sectors’ recovery needs to be based on sustainable tourism development models that boost the efficient use of natural resources while producing less waste and addressing the challenges of climate change and biodiversity (UNWTO, 2020).   The awareness of the significant impact, in terms of GDP, of tourism on a global scale and the growing diffusion of the digital transformation process that the sector is experiencing, also increases attention to the environmental impacts of the sector. On this aim, a new economic paradigm, known as “circular economy” (CE), has emerged recently to deal with the sustainability issues that are increasingly applied in tourism research and practice. CE is considered “an alternative industrial paradigm to the traditional “take, make, dispose of” economic model”. In recent years, the research on CE for sustainability has become an important field of practice and research for the manufacturing sector. While, research and...
  • 14 September 2021

    Re-think Taranto event

    RE-THINK CIRCULAR ECONOMY FORUM APPRODA A TARANTO Conferenza stampa di presentazione Martedì 14 settembre 2021 – ore 11.00 Castello Aragonese, Piazza Castello 4, Taranto Presentazione dell’evento del 28 e 29 settembre in cui aziende, istituzioni, startup ed enti di ricerca mostreranno il loro percorso tutto circolare per favorire la nascita di attività innovative e imprenditoriali nel territorio pugliese 28-29 settembre 2021 – 28 settembre dalle 9.00 alle 18.30 & 29 settembre dalle 9.15 alle 18:16 – Evento in presenza e online – Link per registrazione Milano, 14 settembre 2021 – Mancano pochissimo a Re-think – Circular Economy Forum che, per questa edizione, approda a Taranto. Il 28-29 settembre presso il Dipartimento Jonico dell’Università di Bari la protagonista indiscussa sarà l’economia circolare. Il giorno 14 settembre si è svolta la conferenza stampa dove hanno partecipato il Sindaco di Taranto Rinaldo Melucci, Silvio Busico, Presidente di ITS Logistica Puglia, Francesco Fumarola, Co-fondatore di Tondo, Patrick Poggi Presidente di Eurota ETS, e Gianni Azzaro, Consigliere Nazionale ANCI. Durante la conferenza sono stati annunciati alcuni dei temi che verranno trattati durante la due giorni. Si partirà dal Green Deal, caposaldo europeo per l’attuazione di nuovi importanti cambiamenti nell’industria e non solo, fino a raccontare i progetti più virtuosi messi in campo nel territorio tarantino e pugliese in ambito economia circolare. Tanti gli ospiti d’eccezione locali, nazionali ed internazionali che parteciperanno alla 2 giorni, da corporate e startup ad enti di ricerca ed attori istituzionali, che a diverso livello stanno portando avanti e supportando progetti sull’Economia Circolare. Main sponsor dell’iniziativa è Eni, che, grazie alla sua presenza storica nel territorio, ha instaurato importanti rapporti con il tessuto sociale, mettendo a disposizione conoscenze e risorse, in linea con la vocazione del territorio, per dare voce alle sue innumerevoli potenzialità. Con il contributo di Eni, co-protagonista nell’organizzazione...
  • By Giovanna Matrone and Simone Bambagioni, Tondo associates English Every day organizations take decisions with a direct impact on their internal and external stakeholders. In order to build trust and make stakeholders understand the organization’s true value, risks and opportunities linked to these decisions need to be transparently communicated. A key enabler to realize this process is the sustainability report. A corporate sustainability report is a periodical report released by companies with the goal of making public their commitments – as well as their actions – in social and environmental areas. Although it isn’t (yet) mandatory, an increased interest of public opinion on these areas pushes companies to disclose non-financial information about how they operate and run their social and environmental challenges. So, it becomes mandatory for organizations to give insights about how they’re taking care of environmental (CO2 production, raw material use, energy management) and social (Diversity Equity and Inclusion, respect for human rights) concerns. Being a not-mandatory self-initiative, there is not a regulatory standard to refer to. Therefore, to make this reporting as useful as possible for companies as well as for stakeholders, a unified – widely recognized – standard is required allowing reports to be quickly assessed, fairly judged, and simply compared. Since international companies have started developing sustainability reports, the most used framework is the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI). However, while some (medium-large) organizations choose to write a standardized report useful for specific certifications, others opt instead for a free-style report. Either way, some items are often included: a CEO statement briefly introducing the vision and the drivers behind the sustainability report; a presentation of the organization’s governance structure and business model; a SWOT analysis for opportunities and threats linked to company’s business; a materiality analysis in which the main worries of the organization and stakeholders...
  • 26 August 2021

    Environment & Economy

    by Fabrizio Cinque, Tondo Associate L’ambiente costituisce una fonte di risorse essenziale per il funzionamento del sistema economico, questo perché, come ogni attività umana, l’attività economica si svolge all’interno dell’ambiente naturale. L’ambiente fornisce risorse economiche: le materie prime. Esse sono un bene economico in forma grezza, che l’uomo, attraverso cicli produttivi, può trasformare in beni di consumo pronti a soddisfare i bisogni umani. Ciò però impoverisce l’ambiente, perché nonostante la natura sia una riserva di beni materiali molto grande, non è illimitata, di conseguenza, le materie prime sono risorse scarse. Quando si parla di scarsità di una risorsa naturale questa può essere assoluta (stock) e in tal caso si parla di risorse esauribili (non rinnovabili) oppure relativa, è il caso di risorse rigenerabili (rinnovabili). Ambiente ed Economia sono quindi due sistemi inseparabili e in continua relazione.  Ci sono pertanto due distinti metabolismi sul nostro pianeta: il metabolismo biologico, o della Biosfera, cioè i cicli della natura e il metabolismo tecnico, detto anche Tecnosfera, cioè i cicli dell’industria. Biosfera e Tecnosfera: definizioni e funzionamento La Terra viene divisa da alcuni studiosi in varie «sfere»: Litosfera, Idrosfera, Atmosfera e, da pochi anni, è stata introdotta anche la Tecnosfera.  Il sistema che comprende Litosfera (l’insieme delle terre emerse), Idrosfera (insieme delle acque) e Atmosfera è chiamato Biosfera. Quest’ultima comprende tutti gli ecosistemi della Terra e si può quindi considerare formata dall’insieme degli ambienti fisici del pianeta che possono ospitare organismi viventi. Caratteristica fondamentale della Biosfera è la diversità biologica (o biodiversità), cioè, la varietà di organismi viventi nelle loro diverse forme, e nei rispettivi ecosistemi.  La parola Tecnosfera è stata coniata dal professore di geologia e ingegneria civile della Duke University Peter Haff, che afferma: «La tecnosfera è fatta dalle strutture che l’uomo ha costruito nel tempo: centrali elettriche, linee di trasmissione, strade, edifici, mezzi di trasporto, templi, aziende agricole,...
Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial