Sustainable Mobility

Sustainable mobility at Re-think

At the last Re-think event held in Taranto, one of the topics covered during the three days was sustainable mobility, which is a very important theme. Rethinking infrastructure and the way of moving in a more sustainable way is central to innovating different forms of transportation for more efficient use. Morover, paying attention to resources such as biofuels, hydrogen, and biomethane. and to move toward reducing pollution risks, protecting the health and public spaces.


Eni and Sustainable Mobility

Emanuele Memmola, T&TS – Sustainable Mobility in Eni, explained during his speech what Eni is doing in the world of sustainable mobility. Today we are in a time of unprecedented climate emergency, Memmola said, so either we take action by introducing mitigation actions, or the globe’s temperature will continue to rise. The figure presented by the United Nations Climate Change Report says that from the pre-industrial era to 2021, the temperature has increased by 1° Celsius, and if we combine this degree with global pollution, its value has risen to about 416 parts per million in atmospheric CO2. The forecast is not optimistic. If measures to lower temperatures are not promptly activated, by the end of 2100 the temperature of planet earth will rise by 2.7° Celsius, far from the 1.5° Celsius predicted in the Paris Agreement.


De-carbonization

Although the supply of increasingly renewable sources is evident, there is an ever-increasing demand for energy, especially in developing countries where the fuel mix is more skewed toward fossil sources than renewables. In addition, the world population is continuously growing. This has led to a 60 percent emission of CO2 into the atmosphere over the past three decades due to the effects of climate change.

The main culprits, of course, are energy-intensive industries and the world of transportation, particularly in Europe. Italy has as many as 39 million vehicles for transporting goods and passengers, of which 50 percent are more than 15 years old and is powered by 90 percent diesel and gasoline. On the other hand, only 10 percent by methane, LPG, hybrid cars, and only 1 percent by electric; hence it is clear that there is a need for change. In this scenario, ENI has decided to de-carbonize both the products it puts into consumption, and the processes that produce them, through three main directions:


  • The conversion and transformation of traditional plants, producing plants with bio-production;
  • The supply of renewable sources;
  • Relying on technology neutrality and not pitting technologies against each other but having them work together toward the common goal of de-carbonization;


Sustainable Mobility Solutions

ENI wants to create bridging solutions (such as biofuels, bio-diesel, and bio-methane) to solutions that are not yet mature such as hydrogen and electric. Despite this, ENI has decided to convert traditional plants, such as the Venice Refinery. This, since 2014, instead of being fueled by crude oil has been fueled by animal waste, vegetable waste, spent frying oil, and produces biofuels. Today ENI boasts a refining capacity of 1.1 million tons, with a challenging goal of reaching a biorefining capacity of 5 million by 2030. In heavy transport, the company has acquired 21 biogas plants to turn them into plants that produce biomethane and feed 55 million cubic meters per year into the grid, with targets that are also very challenging.


The first biojet was produced in Taranto: the ITA company made its first flight, in Italy, with biofuel produced at the Taranto refinery.
ENI acquired the second electric operator in Italy, BeCharge, with the idea of expanding its network of charging stations from 9 thousand points to 30 thousand points by 2025. Finally, the first two hydrogen stations for heavy and light mobility were also inaugurated in Mestre. All of this transformation is being done by ENI with the intention of preserving the women and men who work at these sites, with a view to a just and inclusive transition that respects the territories that host it and the operators who work there. That is why in ENI it is called it the Just Transition.


If you want to read the entire report, here is the link. Here is the entire speech on our YouTube channel.


Francesco Castellano

Francesco Castellano holds a Master degree in Business Administration, and he has gathered almost twenty years of experience in research, finance, consulting, and business management. During this time, he was engaged in different types of projects as a consultant at Bain & Company, launched Uber operations in Turin, and worked in the FP&A department at General Electric.Lately, he founded To... Read more

Francesco Castellano holds a Master degree in Business Administration, and he has gathered almost twenty years of experience in research, finance, consulting, and business management. During this time, he was engaged in different types of projects as a consultant at Bain & Company, launched Uber operations in Turin, and worked in the FP&A department at General Electric.

Lately, he founded Tondo, a cluster of organizations focusing on spreading Circular Economy approaches and concepts, and supporting companies in the transition to a clean and circular future. Francesco is also the ideator and coordinator of the Re-think Circular Economy Forum, a format of events organized in many different locations in Italy showcasing the most relevant Circular Economy solutions.

Francesco has been a guest speaker at different universities and events, like Federico II University, Bocconi University, LIUC - Cattaneo University, Pavia University, Padua University, Catholic University, IPE Business School, 24ORE Business School, Campus Party, Torino Stratosferica, Visionary Days.

Francesco is passionate about Circular Economy, Cleantech Innovations, Venture Building and Entrepreneurship.